Putin's Russia

22/02/2016
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As a foreign correspondent in his own country, Arkady Ostrovsky has experienced Russia’s modern history first-hand. From the suddenly wealthy, to the media, to the Kremlin spin doctors, in The Invention of Russia he explores those who have shaped the new Russia. Peter Pomerantsev describes his unique journey into the surreal heart of 21st century Russia in his award-winning Nothing is True and Everything is Possible. They are in conversation with BBC Director of News and Current Affairs James Harding.

James Harding

James Harding joined The FT in 1994, serving as Shanghai Correspondent, Media Editor and Washington Bureau Chief. He joined The Times in 2006 as Business and City Editor and was Editor from 2007 to 2012. He is currently Director of News and Current Affairs for the BBC and is the author of Alpha DogsHow Political Spin Became a Global Business.

Arkady Ostrovsky

Arkady Ostrovsky is a Russian-born, British journalist who has spent fifteen years reporting from Moscow, first for The Financial Times and then as a bureau chief for The Economist. He studied Russian theatre history in Moscow and holds a PhD in English Literature from Cambridge University. His translation of Tom Stoppard’s trilogy, The Coast of Utopia, has been published and staged in Russia.

Peter Pomerantsev


Peter Pomerantsev is a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Global Affairs at the London School of Economics, studying twenty-first century information manipulation and how to fix it. An author and TV producer, he is a widely cited expert on disinformation and media, and writes for publications including Granta, The Atlantic and the Financial Times. His first book, Nothing is True and Everything is Possible, won the 2016 Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Prize, and was nominated for the Samuel Johnson, Guardian First Book, Pushkin House and Gordon Burn Prizes. It has been translated into over a dozen languages.

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